Subject of Brutal Fan Beating, Bryan Stow, on the Path to Recovery

On March 31, 2011, opening day of baseball season, Giants fan Bryan Stow was brutally beaten outside of Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. This merciless beating left Stow, a paramedic and avid fan of the visiting San Francisco Giants, with a severe traumatic brain injury. After the incident, doctors placed Stow in a medically induced coma and performed numerous procedures to remove skull fragments to relieve pressure on his brain and save his life.

Throughout his extensive rehabilitation, there has been an outpouring of support for Stow. The Dodgers and Giants organizations honored him before a game on April 11 and have contributed money to his medical treatment. In addition, while he was recovering, authorities from the Dodgers and Los Angeles Police Department launched a massive campaign to find the men who beat Stow. Due to the coordinated effort, which included tips, interviews and billboards featuring composite drawings of the suspects, police arrested three men in connection with the beating. They are awaiting trial, having pled not guilty.

According to a lawsuit filed on behalf of Stow and his family, the cost of Stow's medical care is estimated at $50 million. The lawsuit seeks compensation for past and future medical treatment and physical therapy in addition to the loss of future earnings and the emotional impact of the incident - not only on him, but on his family.

The lawsuit also calls into question the liability of the Dodgers organization, which provides security outside of the ballpark where the beating took place. Though security was present in the area, the beating occurred in broad daylight outside the stadium, without security personnel coming to Mr. Stow's aid. In addition to the possible liability of the Dodgers, the individual suspects in the crime may be liable if proven to be at fault.

Stow has regained some mobility and can hold limited conversations with friends and family. Doctors have reduced the doses of some of his medications. He was released from the hospital on Oct. 11 to a rehab facility where he and his family hope he can regain more of his everyday abilities. His family and doctors are optimistic about his long-term recovery, and while they know there is a long road ahead, his progress thus far has been positive. At the rehab facility, hopes are high that his recovery will continue.